In honor of Juneteenth

Juneteenth
A group of freed slaves at the harbor in Galveston, Texas. (Bettmann Archive)

 

Juneteenth is a date that should be in every American child’s history book, but it certainly was not in mine. Here’s a brief statement from the History web site:

Juneteenth (short for “June Nineteenth”) marks the day when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas in 1865 to take control of the state and ensure that all enslaved people be freed. The troops’ arrival came a full two and a half years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Juneteenth honors the end to slavery in the United States and is considered the longest-running African American holiday.

That was a start, and maybe, over 150 years later, we’ll finally start seeing more needed change.

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